Electronic Filing Depository

The most common method companies use to raise private capital requires filing notices with each state in which you have an investor. To streamline the process of filing these notices, the North American Securities Administrators Association, Inc. (“NASAA”) created the Electronic Filing Depository (“EFD”).

Who does the EFD help?

The general rule in the United States is that, unless you have an exemption, in order to sell stock in your company, you need to register your stock offering with the SEC. Stock registrations are so expensive and time-intensive that they’re not feasible for most all small companies. As we’ve discussed before, Rule 506 of Regulation D is a “safe harbor” for the private offering exemption of Section 4(a)(2) of the Securities Act….

Read More

social purpose corporation

Yes, an existing Washington business entity can convert into a social purpose corporation (“SPC”). In this blog post, we’ll discuss how an existing traditional corporation can become a social purpose corporation.

To convert a corporation into an SPC, the company needs to take a few steps. First, the board of directors has to recommend the corporate action to the shareholders....

Read More

Scope of Licensing Agreement

An important tool for monetizing your IP is a licensing agreement. When exploring entering into a licensing agreement, it is important to understand how licensing agreements work and the common terms of a licensing agreement. Today’s post highlights what licensing agreements are and some of the common terms included in every licensing agreement.

How do Licensing Agreements work?

A license gives...

Read More

Negotiating valuation cap

It is common for startups to raise early rounds of financing through convertible debt. Convertible debt, generally called a “convertible note,” typically converts into equity when the company raises another round of financing. In anticipation of the conversion, many investors will negotiate for valuation caps and discounts. In today’s post, I’ve highlighted the basics of valuation caps and discounts...

Read More

Investment Club

Raising capital is a costly endeavor and it requires compliance with securities laws. But people who want to pool their funds to help businesses grow have some options to avoid being subject to more restrictive securities requirements. One option is to put together an investment club.

What is an investment club?

Investment clubs are groups of people who pool their...

Read More

Repurchase Option

Most founders are concerned about making sure each of the co-founders are invested in the company. Founders often ask about protecting against a co-founder leaving the company, taking his or her equity, and sharing in the potential future upside value of the startup without continuing to work for that right. To protect against this, startups often have a “repurchase...

Read More

Form D Amendments

When a company decides to raise capital, the company must file Form D giving notice of an exempt offering of securities with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Commission rules require the notice to be filed by companies and funds that have sold securities without registration under the Securities Act of 1933 in an offering based on a claim of...

Read More

Seattle Minimum Wage

Last time we wrote about the new Seattle minimum wage ordinance, we discussed how the International Franchise Association (IFA) filed a federal lawsuit claiming that the ordinance unfairly discriminates against franchisees. The IFA was asking for an injunction to prevent the law from going into effect on April 1. On March 17, federal Judge Richard Jones denied the group’s request...

Read More

SEC Logo

Background

What is a security? Securities are contracts for an interest in a company, sometimes called an “investment contract.” A typical example of a security transaction is the sale of company stock in exchange for cash. The SEC’s definition of “security” includes a 30-item list that stocks, notes, bonds, and investment contracts, among others. We recently discussed the Howey case, which...

Read More

Social purpose corporation

Prior to the emergence of the Washington social purpose corporation (“SPC”) and similar corporate forms in other states, entrepreneurs who wanted to build for-profit companies with specific social values faced a dilemma. They could create a business structured to focus primarily on profits, a corporation. Alternatively, they could create a business focusing on a social mission, a non-profit corporation....

Read More